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the most profound ? Have you, during the investigation, kept strict watch over your minds, and preserved that reason which God gave you to be the guide of life, free, firm, and erect, against the subtil artifices of sophistry, and the still more delusive logic of your own passions? If you have done all this, and are convinced, nevertheless, that apoftacy and disloyalty are your bounden duty, it is well. Forsake your king. Disown your God.”

ART. XXIV. A Sermon preached at tbe Parillo Church of St. Mary,

in Beverley, on Wednesitay, March 12, 1800. Bring tbe Day appointed for a General Faft. By the Rev. Robert Rigby, Vicar.

Svo. Pr. 20. Scatcherd. IT is a very just remark of Mr. Rigby's, “ that days appointed for public humiliation are well adapted for reproving prevailing vices;" and his reproofs are urged with the true spirit and temper of a minister of Christ. He infers from the continuance of the calamities which, for the seventh tiine, we have been called upon to deprecate, that it is owing to the insincerity of our repentance, and to our persererance in fintul practices. He, therefore, with peculiar propriety, admonishes his congregation to rend their bearts and not their garments. He notices and condemns, as characteristics of the times, “an impatience of discipline,” and “the want of a religious principle;" and he offers suitable admonition and advice.

" Let magistrates be careful to put the laws in force. against offenders, and exert their authority to suppress all immorality and debauchery, which tend to fap the foundations of public security. Let all matters of families not only regularly attend their duty at church on the Lord's day themselves, but require the same from their children and servants; and not only restrain them from 1pending that sacred day ill, but, to the best of their ability, encourage and aflift them to spend it well.”

and re-echoed from the gardens of Fernay to the groves of the Palais Royal, and thence through all the affiliated societies of Europe. The same note has gently vibrated on the public ear from the walls of St. Stephen. Not so the venerable Hooker. * Easier a great deal is it for men by law to be taught what they ought to do, than instructed how to judge as they shouid do of law: the one being a thing which belongeth generally unto all, the other such as none but the wiser and more judicious fort can perform. Yea the wisest are always touching this point, the readiest to acknowledge that foundly to judge of law is the weightiest thing which czny man can take upon him.' Hooker's Ecclefiaftical Pol. V. 1. P. 282. Oxford edit. Eft senatori neceffarium noffe rempublicam; idque late patet :-genus hoc omnes fcientiæ, diligentiæ, mentoriæ eft ; fine quo paratus etre senator nullo pacto potest. Cicero de leg.

3. 18."

ART.

Bishop of Killala's Narrative.'

ORIGINAL CRITICISM. most profound? Have you, during the investigation, kesi - watch over your minds, and preserved that reason whics

Sive you to be the guide of life, free, firm, and exei li the subtil artifices of fophiftry, and the still more delubra of your own paflions? If you have done all this, and 28 iced, nevertheless, that apoftacy and disloyalty are yer en duty, it is well. Forsake your king. Disown you.

KXIV. A Sermon preached at the Paris Church of St. Man, Beverley, on Widni fitay, March 12, 1800. Being ibe Day a: il for a General Fift. By the Rev. Robert kigby, Vice. · Pr. 20. Scatcherd.

a very just remark of Mr. Rigby's, “that days appointer lic humiliation are well adapted for reproving prevailing and his reproofs are urged with the truie spirit and temper lifier of Christ. Te inters from the continuance of the » which, for the seventh tiine, we have been called upon to

, that it is owing to the inancerity of our repentance, and Cererance in lintul practices. He, therefore, with peculiar admonithes his congregation to rend their bearts and na 20rts. Ile notices and condemns, as characteristics of the in impatience of discipline," and "the want of a religious ." and he offers suitable admonition and advice. nagiftrates be careful to put the laws in force againtand exert their anthority to fuppress all immorality and 1, which tend to fap the foundations of public security. .

ters of families not only regularly attend their duty a he Lora's day themselves, but require the same from their

from 1pending
d fervants; and not only restrain them
day ill, but, to the best of their ability, encourage and

ART. XXV. On the prevalent and enercasing Negle&t of the Holy Com: munion. A Sermon. To wbich is added, An Appendix, containing,

`an Account of the Number of Communicants; at the Quarterly Sacraments, in the Parish Church of Sheffield, for the last Twenty Years. By George Smith, M. A. Curate of the said Church, and formerly of Trinity College, Cambridge. 8vo. Pp. 27.

6d. Mathews. London. 1800. | WE have long been accustomed to consider the neglect here noticed as one of the most apparent causes of the encrease.of immorality, irreligion, and vice; and our clergy, we are persuaded, cannot do better than frequently to enforce the necessity of regular attendance on the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper, which would do more to reform the morals and manners of the age, than the most forcible admonitions, or the most restrictive laws. By Mr. Smith's account it appears, that, at Sheffield, within the last five and twenty years, but more particularly within the last five years, the decrease of Communicants has been considerable. This is, 'indeed, a serious evil ; and, in the discourse before us, which is able and impressive, the preacher takes great pains to convince his congregation of the fatal effects of such a scandalous néglect of duty.

Art. XXVI. A Letter to the Inbabitants of Sheffield, on a Subject

wbicb bas lately made, and is likely to make, much noise in the Town and Neighbourbood; or, a Sbort Peal on the New Bells. 18mo. Pp. 20. Price 3d. or 2s. 6d. per dozen. Gales.

Sheffield. . WE heartily with that every inhabitant of Sheffield would not only read this little tract, but closely attend to, and implic tly follow, every admonition which it contains; for it is evidently the production of a good Christian, a loyal subject, and a sensible man. The author's reflections on the neglect of public worship are just, his remarks on the use of bells are both amusing and instructive, his exhortations are pious and impressive, and there is not a sentiment in the book “ to which every true Briton and Churchman will not answer with a hearty Amen.”

o spend it well.”

POLITICS.

cd from the gardens of Fernay to the groves of the , and thence through all the affiliated societies of je same note has gently vibrated on the public ear Ils of St. Stephen. Not so the vererable Hooker. at deal is it for men by law to be taught what they

han instructed how to judge as they should do of law: - a thing which belongeth generally unto all, the otherm

but the wiser and more judicious fort can perform. i are always touching this point, the readiest to acat foundly to judge of law is the weightiest thing wbicb zke upon him.' Hooker's Ecclesiastical Pol. V. 1. dedit. Eft lenatori neceffarium noffe rempublicam; ::-genus hoc omnes fcientiæ, diligentiæ, memoriæ aratus elle senator nullo pacto potest. Cicero de leg.

ART.

Art. XXVII. A Narrative of what passed at Killala, in the County

of Mayo, and the Parts adjacent, during the French Inversion in the Summer of 1798. By an Eye-witness. 8vo. Pp. 148. 2s. 6d. Stockdale. 1300. THIS is a well written account of the transactions which it

I profefies to record, having, unquestionably, the great merit of autbenticity, and being interspersed with such reflections as would naturally occur to a person whose feelings and whose inte

reft

reft had been materially affected by the events. It seems to have been written either by the Bishop of Killala himself, or by some one of his family. His Lordship's house was the head-quarters of the French during their stay at Killala; and he pays a very just tribute of applause to the three officers who were left there, after the departure of General Humbert, Charoft, Boudet, and Ponfon, whofe conduct was highly honourable and praiseworthy.

It appears certain from this statement, “ that enmity to the Proteftant religion entered into the motives of the devaftation in Connaught, fince it is notorious, that, except during the indiscriminate plunder which took place at the capture of Castlebar, very few inftances occurred, throughout the province, of the house or property of a Roman Catholic being injured by the rebels,” The condem. nation of the Orange Society, in p. 83, is pronounced in a very dictatorial manner, and without any adequate reason.

ART. XXVII. Speech of the Right Hon. John Beresford, on bis moving

the Sixtb Article of the Union in the House of Commons in Ireland,

Marcb 27, 1800. 8vo. Pp. 39. Wright. London. MR. BERESFORD enters into a comparative statement of the advantages which would have resulted to Ireland from the famous Commercial Propofitions of 1785, had they passed into a law, and of those which the articles of the Union are calculated to secure to her. The arrangement of his subject is perspicuous and methodical; his adduction of facts strong and positive; and his conclufions, in favour of the provisions of the Union, are incontrovertibly juft.

ART. XXIX. Protestant Ascendency and Catholic Emancipation re

.conciled by a Leg Native Union witb a view of the Tranfa&tions in

1782, relative to the Independence of the Iri Ao Parliament, and the prefent political State of Ireland, as dependent on the Crown, and connected with the Parliament of Great Britain. With an Appendix. 8vo. Pp. 141. 3s. Wright. 1800.

THE difcuffion of this momentous question has fet the character of our political writers in a very favourable point of view; for it has certainly called forth a very unusual display of knowledge and ability. If any doubt still remain in the mind of any indi, vidual respecting the finality of the adjustment of 1782, let him read the tract before us, in which a series of historical facts, supported by authentic documents, are adduced to prove, not only that it was not final, but that the very propofition for establishing a final adjustment was indecently rejected by the Irilh Parliament, at the time, and that : too, at the instigation of Mr. Grattan himself, who has so recently and so ftrenuously contended for its finality. This point is not merely argued, but demonstrated, cftablijbed, on a basis not to be taken by affertions, nor overturned by effrontery. The correspondence between the Duke of Portland, the Marquis of Rockinghanı, and the Earl of Shelburne,

ORIGINAL CRITICISM.
had been materially affected by the events. It seems to have
n writim either by the Bishop of Killala himself, or by face

of his family. His Lordship's house was the head-quarters i
French during their stay at Killala; and he pays a very jut es

of applanse to the three officers who were left there, after the
sture of General Humbert, Charoít, Boudet, and Ponson, whé

it was highly honourable and praiseworthy. ?rpears certain from this statement, “ that enmity to the Pin I religion entered into the motives of the devaftation in Ce ut, fince it is notorious, that, except during the indiscrimina. er which took place at the capture of Castlebar, very few is - Occurred, throughout the province, of the house or property oman Catholic being injured by the rebels," The conden

of the Orange Society, in P. 83, is pronounced in a rem
ial manner, and without any adequate reason.

XVIII. Spcecb of tbe Right Hon. Joba Beresford, on bis mouing

Exib Article of tbe Umon in the House of Commons in Ireland, -b 27, 1800. 8vo. Pp. 39. Wright. London. BERESFORD enters into a comparative statement of the es which would have resulted to Ireland from the famous

ial Propofitions of 1785, had they passed into a law, and which the articles of the Union are calculated to secure to : arrangement of his subject is perspicuous and methodie dduction of facts strong and positive ; and his concluvour of the provisions of the Union, are incontrovertibly :

Protestant Afcendency and Catholic Emancipation, &c.' 73 (given in the Appendix) are completely decifive on the subject. The following observations on the fickleness of popular opinion, and the erroneousness of popular judgment, are too judicious to be omitted here.

« Ministers will see from this on what a flippery basis public opinion refts; how evanescent in its duration, how giddy in its decisions. The people, if they were neither mifled by mifrepresentation, nor agitated by national passions, early prejudices, and local habits, are incapable of forming any rational judgment on great constitutional questions and political arrangements. Was there ever yet an instance of any great improvement in agriculture, of any useful discovery in manufactures or the arts, that, (which) if it deviated from the established routine, did not meet with the moft obftinate and inveterate opposition from the very persons for whose benefit it was intended? What riots and disorders has not the introduction of machinery occafioned among our manufactures! What national benefits and improvements had not been loft, if pos pular clamour on these occasions had prevailed over more enlightened ideas? Man is the creature of habit, and the Slave to prejudice; and where these are thwarted, time alonė can reconcile, and experience convince. What reason has the minister to expect that county-meetings, town-halls or corporation dinners, are competent to decide on the results and bearings of a question of such magnitude as the Union? But, if all the exertions that (which) have been used to influence their predominant passions of national pride, to arouse their deep-rooted prejudices of jealousy of Great Britain, and the English ministry, have created a far less agitation and ferment than a variety of animportant objects have continually "produced; he may fairly concludz, that the sense of the Irish nation is not adverse to the measure; though nothing but its actual effects can prove to them the manifold benefits and bleflings with which it will be attended."

In the “ third part” of this tract the author successfully combats an affertion advanced by Dr. Duigenan, that the Irish Romanists, in the late rebellion, “ were vanquished and completely subdued by the Protestant power of the nation, without any assistance from England, in the course of about six weeksi'To this he answers “ I am far from (harbouring) a wish to detract from the merits and good conduct of the Protestant power of Ireland, by reminding the Doctor of what is due to the English and Scotch fencibles, whose example, discipline, and services, had no fmall influence on the good behaviour of the Irih militia ; and who by their exertions kept down and fmothered the rebellion, particularly in Ulster, and faved the country from ruin." -The fact itself is of less consequence than the inference drawn from it, that, if Ireland was separated from England, the Protestants must of necessity be overpowered by the Catholics. He again differs not only from Dr. Duigenan, but from many other respectable writers, concerning the nature of the late rebellion, which, he contends, " was begun, planned, and contriyed by the dissenting republicans of Belfalt; and was purposely

formed that

5. Protestant Afcendency and Catbolic Emancipation the 'y a Legillative Union with a view of the Transactions in lative to the Independence of the Irido Parliament, and the litical State of Ireland, as dependent on tbe Crown, and witb the Parliament of Great Britain. With an Apwo. Pp. 141. 3s. Wright. 1800.

ffion of this momentous question has set the chapolitical writers in a very favourable point of view; inly called forth a very unusual display of knowledge If any doubt ftill remain in the mind of any inding the finality of the adjustment of 1782, let him before us, in which a series of historical fa&s, fup. huic documents, are adduced to prove, not only that , but that the very .propofition for establishing a

was indecently rejected by the Irish Parliament, od that too, at the instigation of Mr. Grattan s so recently and so ftrenuously contended for its oint is not merely argued, but demonstrated, eta, not to be thaken by asertions, nor overturned he correspondence between the Duke of Port

s of Rockinghany, and the Earl of Shelburne,

(given

formed to unite all religions against British connection.” But no Tooner had it broken out “ than the principle was overpowered by the majority of the Roman-Catholics, whose deep-rooted prejudices led them to direct their vengeance on the churches and the clergy ; as the Protestants have since retaliated by burning chapels and destroying cottages, in spite of every precaution which has been used to prevent such excefses.”

In his conclusions respecting the religious tenets of the Catholics, as they tend to affect their political duties as subjects of a Protestant Prince, the author is much too hasty and decisive, not to say that he is at direct variance with that most competent judge, Lord Clare. His observations respecting the property of the church are, to say the least of them, inconsiderate. We are surprized that to able a reasoner should not be aware of the dangerous lengths to which such a principle might be carried. The comparison between the state of France, previous to the revolution, and the actual state of Ireland, is incorrect; and the representation of the public measures immediately preceding the revolution in France is very far from accutate. ---On the whole, however, this is a very able and a very useful tract, as well for immediate information, as for the purpose of reference.

Art. XXX. Union, Prosperity, and Aggrandizement. 8vo.

· Pp. 88. 2s. West and Hughes. 1800. “ WHOEVER," says the author, " attentively investigates the causes of the great political calamities, which in every age have afflicted our unhappy race, will find that they have all originated in delusion. The world has seen the torrents of blood that (which) have flowed, and the tortures that (which) have been inflicted, on account of such words as heretic, infidel, papists, aristocrat, and federalist; the diabolical wickedness that (which) has been com. mitted in the name of religion, and the savage despotism that, (which) under the pretext of liberty and equality, has desolated. realms; but it was a spectacle reserved for the astonishment of the present day, to behold a people, politically nothing, dead to re. nown, destitute of power, freedom, or protection, opposing with fiery zeal, under the delusion of the word, the mere word, independence, a generous offer to convert their servitude into freedom, their abalement into consideration, their poverty into opulence, their subjection into equality, their political annihilation into imperial power.”

There is certainly a great deal of truth in this observation, though we cannot venture to vouch for the accuracy of the melancholy pic. ture here drawn of the Sister Kingdom. The author, however, has ftudied the subject deeply, and he treats it ably. The justice of the following remarks cannot be denied.

" The blunders notoriously committed by a great part of my countrymen, within a short time, are, indeed, most extraordinary: they wanted independence, and they fought the alliance of a power

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