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ftudious forbearance to notice his abominable treachery to the unhappy and persecuted Mary, we cannot, without a violation of duty, suffer to pass without censure. It is but just, however, to observe, that the materials for this account were supplied by the late Professor Anderson, of Glasgow, whose executors would have acted judiciously by configning them to oblivion.

NOVELS AND TALES.

Art. X. The Three Spaniards; a Romance. By George Walker,

Author of the Vagabond, &c. 3 vols. Walker. to present any thing like an analysis of this performance,

would occupy a much larger Ipace than can be allotted to articles of this nature. The Marquis Albert de Denia, the Marquis Antonio de los Velos, and Fernando de Coello, are the three Spaniards whose adventures are contained in these volumes. Albert and Fernando are fellow-foldiers, friends, and related to each other, by a tie of consanguinity. Being stationed at the castle of Alkambra, in the city of Granada, on a leisure day they ramble from the town along the banks of the Darro. Finding themselves fatigued they sit down, and enter into conversation, during which they perceive a small boat floating down the stream without a guide. From a conceit of the moment, they enter it as Knights errant. The boat has but one oar on board, and they are left to the direction of chance: a violent storm arises; they are hurried along to the ruins of a Moorish castle, which project to the water's edge. They find themselves in a strong current, which carries them to the stairs, used for the purpose of landing at the foot of one of the towers. The adventurers go on fhore, and enter the ruins of the castle, which had been dilapidated by an edict of King Philip. In this

building, they find a bundle containing a dagger, and the miniature · portrait of a lady. Of the portrait Fernando immediately becomes

enamoured, and thus commences a series of as wild, extraordinary, and improbable adventures as ever entered the heated mind of infanity.--Supernatural inscriptions, secret voices, celestial music, infernal groans, spectres of various kinds, magical incantations, a compact with the devil, and the actual appearance of Lucifer, present themselves, as Mr. Walker informs us, “ in compliance with the present taste in literary amulement.”We do not consider Mr. W. as one of the common scribblers of the day; to his merits. as a novel writer, we have before borne testimony; but, in wandering into the regions of romance, he certainly has mistaken his path. Wild and daring are the means employed in Lord Orford's Castle of Otranto; but they are the flights of genius: they are awfully terrific. Mr. W. attempts flights equally daring, but his imagination flags beneath the talk, and he links into puerility. Our author's

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jus forbearance to notice his abominable treachery to the py and persecuted Mary, we cannot, without a violaf duty, suffer to pass without censure. It is but juft, 'er, to observe, that the materials for this account were

d by the late Profeflor Anderson, of Glasgow, whose ors would have acted judiciously by configning them rion.

NOVELS AND TALES.

A Winter's Tale.

53 language is not the language of romance: it possesses none of that luxuriance of fancy, that glowing display of imagery and feeling, so advantageous to the page of fi&tion. All is cold and inanimate. His heroes are all cast in the same mould; no strength of passion is exhibited; no distinction of character is preserved.

We can find a pardon for much folly in fome authors, when that folly is really produced in conformity to a reigning prejudice; but we do not think quite so meanly of the 6 present taste in literary amusement” as, in this instance, to award that pardon: nor do we think quite so meanly of Mr. W.'s abilities, as to suppose that a ne--cessity can exist for so ridiculous a misapplication of them, even for the gratification of a vitiated taste, if such there be.

The pages before us are disfigured by a variety of grammatical errors, such as follow : 6 by degrees my mind assumed its tone, from reflecting, that the same power which had hitherto, might continue to protect me”-each being willing in the confusion to take care of themselves"-" Each stole filently to their cell”-" Can a parent have a right to imprison or destroy their offspring from wanton whim or caprice ?"

The Orthography, throughout these volumes, is so glaringly defective, that it might be suppposed that they had been composed by the printer's devil.

· The Three Spanards; a Romance. By George Walker,

Author of the Vagabond, &c. 3 vols. Walker. reient any thing like an analysis of this performance,'' Id occupy a much larger space than can be allotted to

this nature.-The Marquis Albert de Denia, the Mar. inio de los Velos, and Fernando de Coello, are the three whole adventures are contained in these volumes. Al. Fernando are fellow-foldiers, friends, and related to each I tie of consanguinity. Being stationed at the castle of

in the city of Granada, on a leisure day they ramble wn along the banks of the Darro. Finding themselves 'y sit down, and enter into conversation, during which ve a small boat floating down the stream without a guide. ceit of the moment, they enter it as Knights errant. s but one oar on board, and they are left to the direction a violent storm ariles; they are hurried along to the loorish castle, which project to the water's edge. They ves in a strong current, which carries them to the stairs,

purpose of landing at the foot of one of the towers. rers go on shore, and enter the ruins of the castle, en dilapidated by an edict of King Philip. In this y find a bundle containing a dagger, and the miniature ady. Of the portrait Fernando immediately becomes nd thus commences a series of as wild, extraordinary, le adventures as ever entered the heated mind of in. rnatural inscriptions, secret voices, celestial music, s, fpectres of various kinds, magical incantations, a

the devil, and the actual appearance of Lucifer, Ives, as Mr. Walker informs us, “ in compliance

Art. XI. A Winter's Tale. By 3. N. Brewer, Author of the

Mansion House, &c. 4 vols. Lane. THIS historical Romance is founded on a supposed amour of Edward, the Black Prince.

Selina, the daughter of an exiled Earl of Ilford, is protected by the family which succeeds to the title and estate. On her appear. ance at Court, the Prince becomes deeply enamoured, and, gaining information of her residence, pays a visit to Ilford Castle. Due honours are paid to the royal visitor, but the object of his attach... ment does not appear. A desire of secrecy prevents his enquiry on the subject, and, at length, chance discovers her retirement, accord. ing to the command of the Earl, in a remote part of the castle. Se. veral private interviews succeed, and, in one of those moments, when reason yields to passion, the unfortunate Selina falls an unintended victim. The noble nature of the Prince, regretting, equally with Selina, the error into which they had fallen, he leads her through a subterranean passage to the castle chapel, resolving there to take a solemn oath to heaven, never to wed another. A dreadful warning forbids the vow. They explore their path back : the Prince shortly after leaves the castle, and Selina proves pregnant.-Soon after the Prince's return to Court, Sir Emeric Arville, a knight of gloomy aspect, paffes some days at the castle; and the amiable Countess of Ilford is murdered by the hand of private assassins. The Earl is almost frantic, but is under the necessity for some time of attending the army. During his absence, Selina's confinement takes place, and she becomes the mother of a lon, who is conceal

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at taste in literary amulement.”_We do not consider : of the common scribblers of the day; to his merits. r, we have before borne testimony; but, in wanderyions of romance, he certainly has mistaken his path. g are the means employed in Lord Orford's Castle of hey are the flights of genius: they are awfully ter

attempts flights equally daring, but his imagination e talk, and he links into puerility. Our author's

language

ed, together with his nurse, in a secret chamber. On the Earl's re-
turn to the castle revelry of every kind takes place, and he pro-
poses himself as a husband to his astonished ward.Lord Delmond,
ion to the Earl, had allo long cherished a growing passion for Seli-
na. He had secretly discovered her commerce with the Prince,
and resolved to possess her on easy terms. Once, before the Coun-
tess's death, Lord Ilford had rescued her from his villainous at-
tempts. Lord Delmond persists in effecting his purpose: he forces
himself into her chamber, when, alarmed by her cries, the Earl ap-
pears. A fight ensues, and, each ignorant of his opponent, the
son is ílain by the hand of the father.---Lord Ilford's feelings are
wrought almost to phrenzy, yet his resolution of making Selina
his bride remains unalterably fixed; and to her he discovers, that to
effect his design, he had caused the murder of his wife. At this in-
telligence she recoils with horror. The day of marriage is, however,
fixed; she has written to the Prince, then on the Continent, but no
answer arrives, nor does any mode of escaping from the castle pre-
sent itself. The Earl continues determined, and Selina firmly op-
poses his intentions. Finding persuasion to be useless, he resolves
on force. On the night fixed upon for the commission of this
crime, Selina, however, by the aid of Father Frederick, escapes
through a secret passage ; and with her child, her nurse, and one
attendant, passes over to France in quest of the Prince. On the
pight lubsequent to her departure, a message from the Prince to
Lord ļlford arrives at the castle, commanding him immediately to
repair to the army,-Selina and her party are stopped at a fortified
town, in possession of the English, the Governor of which proving
to be Sir Emeric Arville, the murderer of the Counters, the is de-
tained till the arrival of the Earl, who conhnes her in a dungeon
until she shall accede to his wishes. A prisoner overhearing a
conversation between Sir Emeric and the Earl, wherein the latter is
persuaded to enter into a plot for betraying the town into the hands
of the enemy, by means of bribery, effects his escape and flies to
the Prince, who arrives at the moment of meditated treachery. Sir
Emeric is taken prisoner, but the Earl is found among the slain.--
Selina is rescued, and the prisoner, who bore the intelligence to the
Prince, is discovered to be her father, the exiled Earl of Ilford, who
had endeavoured to expiate his former crimes by a return of
loyalty. Sir Emeric Arville is executed ; and the banished Earl,
restored to his fortunes and honours, retires with his daughter to
the family mansion.

The above is an outline of a story possessing a very confiderable
portion of merit. As the author has not abused the privilege of
romance in the exhibition of Supernatural horrors, but has render-
ed them of great effect in the prosecution of his story, we shall, in
this instance, admiť his own apology for their introduction :
." Respecting the liberty I have taken with the world of spirits,
I have little to say, more than that I think public taste a fufficient
fanction for an author using any fair means to interest the passions."!
home." The times of which I write, likewise, must be confidered,

Prejudice

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ORIGINAL CRITICISM. gether with his nurse, in a secret chamber. On the Earl's na w the castle revelry of every kind takes place, and he prolimielf as a husband to his astonished ward.---Lord Desmond, - the Earl, had allo long cherished a growing passion for Sel lie had secretly discovered her commerce with the Prince, Wolved to possess her on easy terms. Once, before the Coun: cath, Lord Ilford had rescued her from his villainous al: • Lord Delimond persists in effecting his purpose: he forces into her chamber, when, alarmed by her cries, the Earl apa

A fight ensues, and, each ignorant of his opponent, the Cain by the hand of the father.-Lord Ilford's feelings at -t almost to phrenzy, yet his resolution of making Selina e remains unalterably fixed; and to her he discovers, that to i design, he had caused the murder of his wife. At this in. e she recoils with horror. The day of marriage is, however, he has written to the Prince, then on the Continent, but no

rives, nor does any mode of escaping from the castle pref. The Earl continues determined, and Selina firmly op: intentions. Finding persuasion to be useless, he resolves

On the night fixed upon for the commission of this Fina, however, by the aid of Father Frederick, escapes secret passage ; and with her child, her nurse, and one palles over to France in quell of the Prince. On the equent to her departure, a message from the Prince to d arrives at the castle, commanding him immediately to le army,- Selina and her party are stopped at a fortified offeffion of the English, the Governor of which proving meric Arville, the murderer of the Countess, she is de. he arrival of the Earl, who confines her in a dungeon lall accede to his wishes. A prisoner overhearing a between Sir Emeric and the Earl, wherein the latter is

The Aristocrat. A Novel, Prejudice was then nearly in its zenith. Visitations, omens, and Warnings of death were implicitly believed to exist by almost all ranks of people ; and a story of those days, which failed to talk, of ghosts, and strange and foreboding noises, would want the charac, teristics of its class.” He adds: “ I have, with all my power, strove to shew the fatal consequences of the first advances to impropriety,"

The catastrophe would have been less pleasing, but perhaps the moral would have been more forcibly inculcated, had Selina fallen a sacrifice. She is not vicious herself, but being the primary cause of error, in those who deviate from the path of virtue, her death would render the warning more awful.

Many careless and confused sentences occur in the course of the work; which is, however, on the whole, well written; but we wish the author to abstain from such faults as---faintened---hoarsened ---an horn--- an heart, &c.

We cannot close this article without remarking the very appro. priate application of the greater part of the mottos prefixed to the respective Chapters. This certainly is no exalted merit, but it evinces a respectability of taste,

enter into a plot for betraying the town into the hands ", by means of bribery, effects his escape and flies to vho arrives at the moment of meditated treachery. Sir en prisoner, but the Earl is found among the slain.ied, and the prisoner, who bore the intelligence to the overed to be her father, the exiled Earl of Ilford, who ired to expiate his former crimes by a return of Emeric Arville is executed; and the banished Earl, s fortunes and honours, retires with his daughter to fion. s an outline of a story possessing a very considerable rit. As the author has not abused the privilege of exhibition of {upernatural horrors, but has rendert effect in the prosecution of his story, we shall, in Imit his own apology for their introduction :

the liberty I have taken with the world of spirits, ay, more than that I think public taste a fufficient uthor using any fair means to interest the passions.". of which I write, likewise, must be confidered,

Prejudice

ART. XII. Mad Man of the Mountain; a Tale. By Henry Sum

mersett, Author of Probable Incidents, &c. 2 vols. Lane..

THIS is a “ tragic tale" of love and murder. To amuse, to ex. cite an interest for fictitious misery, and to bend the passions at will, are not the only requisites of a novelist : j ftrution ought to flow from his peń, and his writings should display a warning to the vicious, and hold forth an encouraging beacon to the chil. dren of virtue,

Roncorone, the madman, the hero of the tale, is deeply injured by Salvini, a villain, without one shade of virtue in his composition. This villain receives the punishment due to his crimes ; but he ought not to fall by the hand of private revenge: vengeance is not the attribute of man. The virtuous, the noble-minded Ron. corone ought not to be the assassin of Salvini. Where the axe of the law cannot reach, the sword of eternal justice will extend, and man must not be the murderer of man.

This piece, though not a maiden effort, betrays several negli. gencies of style: repetitions, redundancies, and unmeasured periods, frequently obtrude themselves on the ear. The story, however, is not devoid of interest; and, at intervals, fome promising traits of geniųs are exhibited, ART. XIII. The Aristocrat. A Novel. In two Volumes, By

the Author of the Democrat. Low, Berwick Street; and Law, Ave-Maria-Lane. 1799.

THIS is a pleasing and interesting litele tale, plain and unaffected in its narrative and construction, and moral in its tendency. The

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contrasted characters of Beverly and Young Eaglefield are given in an instructive and animated manner. Lord Alton is an excellent specimen of true nobility; and Aldworth affords no incorrect portrait of an English gentleman of the old school. Our principal objection to this work arises from too much of the marvellous appearing in some of the discoveries. For instance, the meeting between Colonel Fraser, his brother, and family ; and that of Hamilton and Aldworth, at the the end of the second volume. Such circumstances, though possible, are scarcely within the line of probability, and, whenever they occur in a production of this nature, considerably diminish the intereft and pleasure experienced in the perusal of it."

Art. XIV. New Tales of the Castle; or the noble Emigrants.

A Story of Modern Times. By Mrs. Pilkington. Newbery. 1800.

Art. XV. The Moralift; or amusing and interesting Dialogues

on Natural, Moral, and Religious Subječts, calculated to afford rational and improving Entertainment to the ingenious Youth. Bý the Author of Hamlain, &c. &c. West and Hughes. 1800.

Art. XVI. History of Jack and his eleven Brothers; containing

their Separation, Travels, Adventures, &c. Intended for the • Use of little Brothers and Sisters. Weft and Hughes. 1800. ' ,

TO those of our readers who have observed with attention the progress of Jacobinism, and seen what various forms it has assumed to accomplish its atrocious designs with the greatest facility, we make no apology for obtruding upon their notice the above three Articles. To prevent as much as possible the untainted minds of the rising generation from being corrupted by the peftiferous doctrines of the day, we think it necessary occasionally to examine even those books which are professedly written for the nursery. The purity of our intentions in so doing will only be questioned by those who find their schemes frustrated by this exposure; and the effect of them, we hope, will Tów itself in the permanent benefit our children will derive from this detection of what is evil, and suppost of what is good. The two

former of these articles we can safely recommend to mothers and go. · verneffes, as being amusing and instructive in a high degree. In the

last, although we do not discover any of the mischief which it is our duty to reprobate, we do not perceive any thing by which the infant mind will either be entertained or improved. We recommend to the author, if he particularly wishes to write for the accommodation of children, to revise his work, and, instead of a dozen unintelligible and confused tales, to confine it to one plain and simple narrative. .

THE

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