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while your committee would go thus far for the sake of the Union, they would enter their solemn pro:est against the principle contended for, that one State possesses the right to nullify, resist or set at naught, an act of Congress of the United States. Such a right they have no hesitation in declåring, is, in their belief inconsistent with every idea of an union of the States. On this subject they connot be too explicit. They would deny it in all its forms, in whatever questionable shape it might present itself. They cannot per: ceive ihe least difference between the concession of this right, and the abandonment of the Union. If such a distinction exists, it has escaped the penetration of your committee. At a time when spec. ulation is busy calling in question the first axioms of government, and denying the correctness of those principles, which have heretofore been held indisputable and sacred, your committee have thought that a recurrence to the fundamental principles of our confederacy, as laid down by the fathers of the republic, would better subserve the interest of the country, than any suggestions which they might make,

A certain state paper entitled, the solemn declaration and protest of the Commonwealth of Virginia, on the principles of the constitution of the United States of America, and on the violation of them, drawn by Thomas Jefferson, closes in the following manner, “And as a further pledge of the sincere and cordial attachment of this Commonwealth to the union of the whole, so far as has been consented to by the compact called the constition of the United States of America, construed acording to the plain and or dinary meaning of its language to the comnion intendment of the time, and of those who framed it, to give also, to all parties and authorities time for reflection, and for consideration whether under a temperate view of the possible consequences, and especially of the constant obstructions, which an equivocal majority must ever expect to meet, they will still prefer the assumption of this

power, rather than its acceptance from the free will of their constituents, and to preserve peace in the mean while we proceed to make it the duty of our citizens, until the Legislature shall otherwise, and ultimately decide to acquiesce under those acts of the Federal branch of our government, which we have declared to be usurpations, and against which in point of right we do protest as null and void and never to be quoted as precedents of right. We therefore do enact and be it enacted by the General Assembly of Virginia, That all citizen of this Commonwealth, and persons and authorities, when the same shall pay full obedience at all times to the acts which may be passed by the Congress of the United States, the object of which sball be the construction of post roads, making canals of navigation, and maintaining the same in any part of the United States,

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in like manner as if said acts were totidem verbis passed by the Legislature of this Commonwealth."

It should be borne in mind that this is the close of a solen:n protost of the Legislature of Virginia, against the right of the General Government, to pass laws for the making of roads and canals, and yet under the temperate counsel of a Jefferson, acquiescence and remonstrance and not nullification was the proposed remedy.

The following is from Washington's farewell address.

"The unity of government which constitutes you one people, is also dear to you. It is justly so. For it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real Independence; the support of your tranquility at home, you peace abroad, of your safety, of your prosperity, of that very liberty which you so highly prize. But as it is easy to foresee that from different causes, and from different quarters, much pains will be taken, many artifices employed to weaken in your minds the conviction of ihis truth. As this is the point in your political fortress, against which the batteries of external and internal enemies will be most constanıly and actively, though often covertly and insiduously directed; it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national urion to your collective and individual happiness. That you should cherish a cordial habitual and immovable attachment to it.

Accustom yourselves to think and speak of it as the palladium of your political safety and prosperity, discountenancing whatev. er may suggest a suspicion, that it can in any event be abandoned, and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the net, or to enfeeble the sacred tics which now link together the various parts."

Such were the doctrines of Jefferson, and such was the advice of Washington. Our government was formed in a spirit of compromise and concession, and by such a spirit it must be preserved. But should not these measures of peace and conciliation be met in a like spirit, by those who are disaffected? We rely upon the wisdom and firmness of those to whom the good people of these United States, have delegated the necessary powers, to adopt such measures as may to them seem best to preserve the dignity of the gov. ernment, and the integrity of the Union.

Your committee believe the liberty and union of the States to be inseperable and that the one cannot long exist without the oth

We would then make one more appeal to our disaffected brethren. We would exhort them to pause in what our conscicoces constrain us to call their mad career--To reflcct that this is the last abode of freedom, and liberty is here trying her last experiment whether civilized man is capable of self government? If she fails here, she fails forever. The last hope of the philanthropist

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will be blighted, and the thick darkness of anarchy and despotism will settle upon the hills and vallies now verdant with the cheering influence of the sun of liberty.

Let us see to it, that the men of this generation have no agency in producing so direful a catastrophe, for then will the croakings of legitimacy have proved too true. Then indeed it may be said Washington and Jefferson have lived and Hancock has bled in vain.

Which report was read.
Mr. Gove of Goffstown, introduced the following resolution.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened, That the report of the select committee to whom was referred so much of thc Governor's message, as relates to "certain new and dangerous opinions, in regard to the respective powers of the General and State governments” be accepted, and that the same be promulgated as containing the sentiments of this Legislature.

Which was read. On motion of Mr. ChamberlainOrdered, That said report and resolution lie on the table. On motion of Mr. BarnesOrdered, That the Clerk procure three hundred printed copies of said report and of the aforesaid resolution, and lay the same before the House.

On motion of Mr. Brownson

The House resumed the consideration of the resolution as to the exdediency of abolishing imprisonment for debt, and after some time spent therein. 'On motion of Mr. Barnes-Ordered, That said resolution lie on the table.

The House proceeded to the order of the day on the bill with the following tilie.

An act to annex Winslow's Location to Piercy.
Which was read a third time.
Resolved, That it pass, and that its title be as aforesaid.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate therein.

The House proceeded to the order of the day on the resolution granting a certain tract of land to Abel Crawford.

Which was read a third time.
Resolved, That it pass.

Ordered, That the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate therein.

A message from the Senate by their Clerk-" Mr. Speaker-The Senate concur with the House of Representatives in the passage of the following bills. An act to revive the act establishing a corporation by the name

of the Walpole Manufacturing Company,

An act to incorporate the Aquedocton Cotton Mill Company,

An act to repeal the Charter of the Proprietors of the Rindge Turnpike Road in New-Hampshire.

Also in the bill entitled, An act to incorporate sundry persons by the name of the Shelburne Androscoggin Bridge corporation, with an amendment, in which amendment they ask the concurrence of the House.

The House proceeded to the consideration of the amendment proposed by the Senate, to the bill entitled, An act to incorporate sundry persons by the name of the Shelburne Androscoggin Bridge Corporation.

Which amendment was read.
Resolved, That the House agree to said amendment.
Ordered, That the Clerk inform the Senate thereof.

The following message in writing was received from His Excellency the Governor by the Secretary of State, which was read and is as follows.

Executive Department,

Dec. 13, 1832. To the Senate and House of Representatives.

In complyance with the request of His Excellency the Governor of the State of South-Carolina, I herewith communicate a copy of the proceedings of a convention of the people of that State, bearingdate November 24, 1832.

SAMUEL DINSMOOR. On motion of Mr. Wilcox

Ordered, That His Excellency's message with the accompaning papers be referred to the Selcel committee to whom was referred so much of His Excellency's message as relates to "certain new and dangerous opinions in regard to the respective powers of the General and State Governments."

Mr. Corbin pursuant to notice given yesterday had leave to in troduce a bill entitled, An act authorizing Selectmen to tax the rateable estate of legatees and wards in the hands of executors, ad. ministrators, trustees or guardians.

Which was read a first and second time.

Ordercd, That said bill be referred to the committee on the Judiciary.

On motion of Mr. Gove of Goffstown--The House resumed the consideration of the bill entitled, An act relating to the organizations of the Courts of justice.

Which was read a first and second tine.
Ordered, That it be referred to the committee on the Judiciary.
A Message from the Senate by their Clerk.

“Mr. Speaker--The Senate disagree to the amendment proposed by the House of Representatives to the bill entitled, An act to incorporate Israel's River Manufacturing Company."

On motion of Mr. Wilcox--
Resolved, That the House recede from said amendment.
Ordered, That the Clerk inform the Senate thereof.

The House proceeded to the order of the day on the bill enti. tled, An act in addition to, and in explanation of an act for settling off debts, mutual demands, and executions against each other, passed Feb. 8, 1791.

Which was read a second time.

Ordered, That said bill be referred to the committee on Bills on their second reading.

Mr. Freese from the committee on Military affairs, to whom was referred the petition of Otis Stackpole,by leave of the House made a report accompanied with the following resolution.

Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened, That Otis Stackpole have and receive out of the treasury of this State, the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars in full of all claims for damages and services in the militia of NewHampshire, and the treasurer is hereby authorized to pay the same accordingly. Which

was read a first and second time. On motion of Mr. Hale-Ordered, That it lie on the table.

And then the House adjourned.

FRIDAY, DEC. 14, 1832.Mr. Farnum presented the petition of Danforth McIntosh for the alteration of his name.

Ordered That it be referred to the committee on the alteration of names.

Mr. Allen presented the petition of sundry inhabitants of the town of Winchester that James Henry, jr. may be admitted as altorney at the bar in the courts of this state by Legislative enactment.

Mr. Wild presented the petition of sundry inhabitants of the town of Chesterfield on the same subject.

Ordered, That said petitions be referred to the committee on the Judiciary.

Mr. Goodrich from the committee on the Judiciary to whom was referred the petition of Charles M. Russel and others for the passage of a law for the security of mechanics who construct buildings by contract made a report, accompanied with the following resolution.

Resolved, That it is inexpedient to legislate on this subject.
Which was read.
Mr. Sanborn moved, That said resolution lie on the table.
Which was decided in the negative.
The question recurred, Shall this resolution pass!

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