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LIQUOR TRAFFIC.

LIQUOR LICENSES AND FEES. Alabama-Since the repeal of the Prohibition Nebraska-Local option, fee $500-$1,000. law a number of counties have held local option Nevada-State license $150 per annum wholesale, elections, the majority of them deciding for a 8100 per annum retail, drug store $25 perannum. licensed liquor traffic.

New Hampshire-License by majority of votAlaska-Local option under acts of Congress. ers, fees based on population, maximum $1,200. License, $1,000.

New Jersey-Local option, see $100-$1,000. Arizona - Local option, quarterly fee, United New Mexico-License by local authorities in

States license 825 annually. County and State incorporated cities and towns, by county com$300 annually. By vote of November, 1914, missioners in unincorporated towns. License fee adoption of prohibition in doubt wheu ALMANAC $100-$1,500, varying in different municipalities, was printed

New York-Local option in towns, lee $150 to Arkailsas --On October 13, 1913, the State Supreme $1,200, according to population. Court sustained the validity of the Going Prohi. North Carolina-Prohibition. Official records bition bill, making Arkansas a prohibition State show that 5,279 gallons of liquor were shipped January 1, 1914.

into Greensboro in the month of December, 1913, California - Local option, fee by authorities. averaging 195.1 gallons a day. Colorado-By voteof November, 1914, adoption of North Dakot n-By vote of November, 1914,

prohibition in doubt when ALMANAC was printed. adoption of prohibition in doubt when ALMANAC Connecticut-Local option, fee $150-$150. was printed Delaware-New Castle County and city of Wil Ohio-Local option, fee $1.000. The liquor

mington, licensed. Kent and Sussex Counties, interest contends that the Anti-Saloon League probibition.

initiated bill prohibiting the carrying of liquor District of Columbia-Licenses issuable at into dry territory was unconstitutional,

discretion of Excise Board, except within certain Oklahoma-Express companies are prohibited prescribed areas in which public institutions are from carrying shipments of liquor in the part located; except within certain distances of of Oklahoma known as Indian Territory prior churches and educational institutions, and sub to Statehood and over which prohibition for ject to other restrictions in the interest of public twenty-one years was established by the Fed. order and the diminution of temptation. Whole eral Goverment, according to a decision handed sale see, $800; bar-room fee, $1,500 per annum. down by the United States Circuit Court of Florida - Local option, fee 1,000.

Appeals. Georgia-The Prohibition law is practically a Oregon-Local option, fee $400. By vote of

dead letter in the cities and poorly entorced in November, 1914, adoption of prohibition in doubt the country districis.

when ALMANAC was printed. Hawaii-License by commissions appointed by Pennsylvanin-License under control of courts, the Governor.

fee $100-$1,100. Idaho-Local option by counties, fee $750. Porto Rico-Licenses controlled by the TreasIllinois - Local option licenseby City Council or urer of Porto Rico. Issited and paid quarterly,

Village or County Board, fee not less thau $500. first day of every quarter. Transferable upon Indiann-City and township. Whenever 20 per application to Treasurer. cent, of the voters of the county petition ine Rhode Island - Local option, fee $300—$1,500. County Commissioners the latter shall be a South Carolina-Local option, county control * yes", or "no'' vote as to prohibiting the sale or prohibition. In August, 1913, the question of intoxicants by saloons within the county. of the re-establishment of dispensaries was voted Iowa -Liceuse by petition of voters, fee $600 op. on in certain "dry'' counties, and there was a Kansas --Prohibitiou. Records required by gain of seven counties to the dispensary system. Mahin Liquor law show that in the month of South Dakota-Liceuse by local authorities, September, 1913, 90,062 gallons of liquor were fee $400-$600.

received in Topeka, a city of 45,000 inhabitants. Tennessee --State-wide prohibition under a fourKentucky-County local option, except cities of mile law, but is not being enforced in the four the first, second and third classes may vote large cities by the local authorities. Separately; fee $150.

Texas - License for State and county issued by the Louisiana - Local option, fee $200 up.

County Clerk; fees, State $375, county $187.50, Muline - Probibition. In Portland, Maine, there

city $187.50; city license issued by city tax were 4,006 arrests for drunkenness in the year collector. 1913, according to the records of the Chief of

Utah - License granted by local authorities, fee Police of that city.

$100-$2.000. Maryland - Local option, fee $18-$450.

Vermont-License Local Option act was approved Massachusetts-Local option, fee for first-class December 11, 1902, aud took eileet March 3, 1903.

license uot less than $1,000; number limited, one Virginia-Control of local courts, malt liquor to one thousaud iubabitants; in Boston, one to bar license $250, retail ardent spirits $550, wholeAve hundred.

sale ardent spirits $1,250, wholesale malt liquors Dlichigan - Local option; license, warehouse and $500, retail and shippery $1,000, local option pro

agency, $50; manufacturer, $65; wholesale or vided for. State-wide prohibition in eilect retail, $500; at wholesale and retail, $800.

November, 1916. Minnesota-License fee, $500-$1,000.

Washington-Local option, fee $300-$1,000. By Mississippi-Prohibition.

vote of November, 1914, adoption of prohibition Missouri -The counties (and cities of 2,500 popn in domht when ALMANAC was printed. Jariou, or more) may, by majority voie, pass West Virginia-State-wide prohibition in effect the Local Option law, and if this is not done the on July 1, 1914. county courts may grant a license and fix a tax Wisconsin- Local option, fee $100-$900, with of not less than $200 nor more than $400 per powerin voters to increase from $200-3500. Baker year for State and not less than $500 por more law provides one saloon to each 200 persons. than $800 for county purposes.

Wyoming --Wholesale dealer, $300; retail, $1,000. Montana-Semi-annual lee, $150-$300.

City license additional.

THE NATIONAL TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. President-Rev. David S. Dodge. Editor and Lecturer - Prof. A. A. Hopkins, Ph. D. Treasurer John W. Cummings.

The National Temperance Society and Publication House was organized in 1865 for the special work of creating and circulating sound temperance literature to promote the cause of total abstinence from all Intoxicants, and to unlly and concentrate the temperance and Christian sentiment of the Nation against the drink habit and the drink traffic. The headquarters of the society is at 373 Fourth Avenue, New York City.

Isquel, Sept. 30,

Saisons,

LIQUOR TRAFFIC IN NEW YORK CITY. Comparative table showing the number of licenses issued and net receipts under excise boards for year ending April 30, 1896 (old law), also number of liquor tax certifi ates in force, net revenue, State's share of net revenue, boroughs' share of net revenne, henefit to boronghs by diminished State tax, together with total benefit to each borough comprising the city of New York, for the year ending September 30, 1914 (new law).

Number
Number

Benefit to
of Cer-
of

Boroughs'
Net Receipts
State's Share

Total
tificates
Net Revenue

Boroughs by

Share Net
Net Revenue

Benefit to
Licenses

Under Ex-
in Force
Year Ending

Revenue

Diminished
BOROUGHS.

cise Boards, Sept. 30, 1914
Yenr Ending

Esch Borough

State Tax

Year Ending
1895-96
1895-96

Year Ending
1914
(New Law).

Year Euding

Sept. So, 1911
(ola
(Old Law).

Sept. 30, 1914

(New Law). (New

Sept. 30, 1914 Sept. 30. 1914

(New Law). Law),

(New Law). Ls).

(New Law). Manhattan.

5,521

8,906 Bronx....

$5,979,108.75 82,989,554. 37 $2,989,554.38 84,173.884.05 $7.163.438 43 $1,056,013. 10 986

949, 421, 35 474,710.63 474.710.62 499.357.53 973,68. 14 Brooklyn... 4,702 3,428 599,115. 89 3.669,675.00 1,834,837.50 1.834,837.50 1,333,674, 81 3,168,512 34 Queens

1,200 1,702 43,424.61 548,990. 35 274,495.17 374,195.18 382,527.60 657,022 78 Richmond...

543 540 38,364.83 178,507.50 89,253.75 89,253. 75 65,882.34 155,136.09 Total. ...... 15,357 12,177 $1,736,918. 43 $11,325,702.85 $5,662,851. 42/85,662,851,43 $6,454,326.35 $12,117.177.78

Table showing the number of liquor tar certificates (covering hotels, saloons, clubs, etc.) in force September 30, 1914, by boroughs, in the city of New York.

Saloon,

Hotels.
BOROUGHS.

BOROUGHS.

Hotels.
Clubs, etc

Cbs, etc. Manhattan and Bronx

865
4.51 Riciimond

205

216 Brooklyn

395

2,596 Queens...

439
1.055
Total New York City.

1,903 8.377 WINE PRODUCTION OF THE WORLD. The following table shows estimates of wine production in gallons by the principal wine-producing countries according to the French publication Moniteur Vinicole, and is for the year 1913. COUNTRIES.

Gallons.

COUNTRIES. Gallons. COUNTRIES. (allons Italy .......... 1,370,524,993 Germany.

26,417,000 Bolivia...

1.:03.04 France 1,166,885,278 Rumania..

26,417,000 Bulgaria.

1,056,680 Spain...

432,610.709 Turkey and Cyprus.. 23,775,300 Azores, ('anaries and Algeria 196,297,805 Brazil.. 13,208,500 Madeira

766,093 Argentina 134,726,700 Servia..

10.566,800 Canada... Russia 129,143,300 Tunis. 9,246,950 Mexico...

211, Chile.. 118.876,5001 Australia.

7,000,505 Persia. Portugal 46,615,675 Switzerland.

6,974,089 Luxemburg. Greece and Islands. 73,9657.600 Uruguay.

5,124,898 Egypt......

23,417 Austria ..

55,475,700 Cape of Good Hope. 4.226, 720 Hungary 54,154,850 Peru......

3,962,550 Total.

3,999,662,106 United States.. 39,625,500 | Corsica...........

3,186,920 WHEN TO SERVE BEVERAGES.

(From Osborn's Vintage and Production of Wines and Liquors. ) Appetizer-Dry Pale Sherry plain or with a dash With Roast-Claret, Burgundy, or Chianti. of bitters, Vermouth plain or a Cocktail.

With Game-Champague (cold), Old Vintage With Oysters-Rhine Wine, Moselle, Dry Sau Champagne; cool. ternes, Chablis or Capri; cool.

With Pastry- Madeira; cool.
With Soup --Sherry, Madeira, or Marsala; cool. With Cheese-Port.
With Fish-Sauternes, Chablis, Rhine Wine, With Fruit-Tokay, Malaga, or Muscat. *
Moselle or Capri; cool.

With Coffee-Brandy or Cordial
With Entrées-Claret or Chianti..

* Temperature of room.

UNITED STATES BREWERS' ASSOCIATION. President--Edward A. Schmidt, Philadelphia, PA. First Vice-President-Gustave Pabst, Milwaukee, Wis. Second Vice-President-Louis B. Schram, Brooklyn, N. Y. Third Vice-President John Gardiner, Philadelphia, Pa. Treasurer —Gustav W. Lembeck, Jersey City, N. J. SecretaryHugh F. Fox, New York, N. Y.

THE PRISON ASSOCIATION OF NEW YORK. President, Eugene Smith. Treasurer-J. Seely Ward. Gen. Secretary-O, F. Lewis. Headquarters, 135 E. 15th Street, New York City.

Chartered in 1846. Its objects are to secure: 1. The protection of society against crime. 2. The reformation of the criminal. 3. Protection for those unjustly accuseil. 4. Probation for first offenders. 5. Improvement in prisons and prison discipline.' 6. Employment, and, when necessary, food, tools, and shelter for discharged prisoners, 7. Necessary aid for prisoners, families. 8. Super vision of those on probation and parole. 9. Needed le, islation and correction of abuses in our penal system,

NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON PRISONS AND PRISON LABOR. Chairman-Thomas Mott Osborne. Secretary-Treasurer - R. Montgomery Schell. Chairmas Erecutive Commillee-Adolph Lewisohn. Headquarters, Broadway and 116th Street, New York.

"The object of this organization is to study the whole problem of labor in prisons and correctional Institutions, with a view to securing legislation among the States of the Union, to the end that all prisoners may be so employed as to promote thelr welfare and at the same time to reimburse the institutions for expense of maintenance, while preventing unfalr competition between prison-made goods and the products of free labor, and securing to their dependent familles a falr proportion of the rightful earnings of prisoners."

PRISON POPULATION IN 1910.

(From a report issued by the Bureau of the Census.) THESE figures include every class of offence from vagrancy to murder in the first degree.

These also include cases in which the offender was committed to jail or prison for the non-payment of & fine. For this and other reasons the totals and ratios which are shown for the different States are not to be regarded as measuring the criminal tendencies of their inhabitants.

GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS.

98

84

United States..
New England..

Malne.
New Hampshire
Vermont.
Massachusetts.
Rhode Island.

Connecticut.
Middle Atlantic..

New York,
New Jersey

Pennsylvania,
East North Central.

Ohio.
Indiana.
Illinois.
Michigan,

Wisconsin..
West North Central.

Minnesota.
Iowa...
Missouri.
North Dakota.
South Dakota.
Nebraska.

Kansas.
South Atlantic..

Delaware.
Maryland.
District of Columbia,
Virginia.
West Virginia.
North Carolina.
South Carolina.
Georgia..

Florida.
East South Central.

Kentucky.
Tennessee..
Alabama..

Mississippi.
West South Central.

Arkansas.
Louisiana.
Oklahoma.

Texas.
Mountain.

Montana.
Idaho.
Wyoming
Colorado.
New Mexico.
Arizona.
Utah.
Nevada..

SENTENCED PRISONERS.
Number

Discharged, of Penal Present in Penal Insti-l Committed to Penal Dying or Insti

tutions on Jan. 1. 1910. Institutions in 1910. Transferred tutions. Total Per 100,000 Total

in the Year

Per 100.000
Number. Population. Number. Population.

1910. 2,823 112.881

123 479,256

521 476,468 93 10,594 162 50.674

773 51,502 18 730

5,252

707

5,162 18 508 118 1,501

349

1,513 14 397 112 1.564

439

1,829 25 6,710 199 31,419

933 32,247 6 730 135 2,528

466

2,399 12 1,519 135 8,410

754

8,352 224 23,658 122 110,929

574 112.063 79 12,498 137 45.763

502 47,257 28 2,985 118 11,607

457 11,517 117 8,175 107 53,559

699 53,289 497 16,247

89 82,224

451 81,787 95 4,004 81 18,870

396 18,433 93 2,870 106 13,293

492 13,166 143 5,111

91
28,017

497 28,145
2,588
92 12,365

440 12,303 SO 1,674 72 9,679

415

9,740 537 10,387

89 51,456

442 51,175 75 1,631 79 10,386

500 10.501 108 1,354

61 13,018

585 12.905 121 3,570 108 15,836

481 15,708
34
367

64
942

163

996 282 48 1.608

275

1,589 60 658 55 5,788

485

5,682 95 2,525 149 3,878

229

3,794 452 19,835 163 66,189

543 65,097 3 290 143 1.988

983

1,985 17 2,148 166 8,915

688

8,838 3 787 238 5,635

1,702

6.362 109 3,309 161 12,534

608 12,571 58 1,470 120 6,033

494

5,976 70 1,433 65 2,721

123

2,442 50 1.746 115 5,505

363

5,130 10S 6,816 261 12,981

498

12,161 34 1,836 244 9,877

1,312

9,632 330 11,466 136 36.273

431 35.022 121 2,739 120 14,005

612 13,786 89 2,753 126 9,967

456

9,699 55 3,693 173 8.633

404

8,355 65 2,281

127
3,668

204

3,182 321 9.724 111 26,249

299 25,407 62 1,308 83 4,944

314

4,769 45 2,403 145 4,785

289

4,449 66 1,687 102 6,121

369

5,942 148 4,326 111 10.399

267 10,247 219 4,505 171 22,218

844 21,721 29 963 250 4.021

1,069

4.039 287 88 1,162

357

1,113
14
288

197
742

508

724 57 1,230 154 4,866

609

4,902 25 409 125 1,879

574

1,783 23 645 316 6,841

3,348 6,596 31 394 106 1,792

480

1,651
15
289

353
915
1,118

913
150 6,465
154 33.044

788 32,694 1.660 145 10,198

893

10,392 33 623 93 6,431

956

6.261 4.182

176
16.415

6901 16.041

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Pacinc..

Washington
Oregon
Californla..

According to a revised census report issued in 1914 of the inmates in prisons on January 1, 1910, 143 were under sentence of death, 6,444 were under sentence of life imprisonment, and 3,840 to twenty yearg' Imprisonment or more. of the total number in prisons, penitentiaries, jails and work houses there were 105,362 males and 6,136 females, comprised of native whites, 52,473; foreignborn whites, 19,438, and, colored, 38,701. In institutions for juvenile delinquents, 24,974, including all classes.

COMPILED FROM THE CODES OR REVISED STATUTES OF THE WITHIN the limits of the subjolned table showing the penaltles prescribed by the respective States for the offences enumerated it is impossible to attain complete accuracy in comparing the several penalties, for the reason that the provisions of the several States defining these very familiar crimes are not identical. Especlally is this true in regard to crimes classified in degrees, some States making but little attempt In that direction, leaving It to the discretion of the trial court to adapt the severity of the punishment to the gravity of the offence, while other States provide a minute classification Into degrees, depending on the several possible circumstances attending the commission of the crime.

Murder in the First Degree in the table below-may be generally defined to be the unlawful intentional and premeditated killing of a human being, or such a kulung resulting from the commission or attempt to commit one of the graver crimes such as arson, burglary, rape or robbery.

Murder In the Second Degree is such a killing without premeditation, or resulting from the attempt to commit some lesser crime.

Manslaughter may be defined as a killing elther unintentionally resulting from the careless or unlawful doing of some otherwise lawful act or from the commission of some unlawful act of comparatively trivial character, or intentionally, in the heat of passion and without premeditation.

Arson---where classified in degrees--though the number and exact definition of degrees varies greatly-is in general classified with reference to two conditions. First, the character of the bullding burned, whether a dwelling house or structure likely to or containing a human being; and, second, whether the crime is perpetrated by day or night. Thus the most serious offence is the burning of en Inhabited dwelling by night, and the least serious, the burning of an uninhabited structure by day. Often intermediate degrees are recognized, sucb as burning a dwelling by day or an uninhabited building by night. Burglary-The classification of burglary or house breaking depends on substantially the same Murder,

Manslaughter.

Assault with
STATE.
1st Deg
2d Deg.
Ist Deg. 2d Deg. Intent to Kill

Robbery. 1 Alabama. Death or Not Less

1-10
Not over

2-20 Death or
11le im-
than 10

1 and

not less prisonment

$500

than 10 2 Alaska... Death or Ille Not less

1-20

1--15

1-15 mprisonment than 15 3 Arizona. Death or Not less Not over

5 up to Not less lile imthan 10 10

llle im

than 5 prisonment

prisonment 4 Arkansas..

Death
5-21

2-7
Not over
1-21

3--21

12 months 5 California. Death or Not less Not over

1-14

Not less life imthan 10 10

than 1 prisonment 6 Colorado Death or Not less

1-8
Not over
1-14

3-14
Ille Im-
than 10

1
prisonment up to lile
7 Connecticut Death

Lile im-
Not over

10-30 Not over prisonment 10 and $1,000

7 8 Delaware.. Death

Life im-
Not over

Not over Not over
prisonment
5

5 (e)

12

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SEVERAL STATES AS AMENDED BY SUBSEQUENT LEGISLATION. elements as that of arson, namely the building entered, whether a dwelling or other building, and whether the offence was committed by day or night.

Robbery may be generally defined as the theft of property from the person or immediale presence of the victim, accomplished by force or fear. Where degrees of robbery are recognized, the distinction is generally determined by whether the thief be armed or unarmed, though some States also distinguish the second from the first degree, where the theft is accomplished by means of threats of future rather than immediate injury,

Grand Larcony is simple thert, of property above a fixed value, generally $25 to $50-most States also classify as grand larceny theft of property from the person of the victim irrespective of value, though of course, accomplished without the force or fear which constitute the crime of robbery.

Assault with intent to kill, bigamy, forgery, perjury and rape, are not subdivided into degrees in the subjoined table.

Where crimes are divided into several degrees It is generally within the province of the jury in convicung, to fix the degree of the crime, and in almost every case in which a crime is punishable by death or imprisonment, it is the province of the jury to determine the punishment, except upon å plea of guilty, when the duty devolveg upon the Court.

Where the classification of a crime in a particular State does not approximately agree with the definitions given above, note is made of the fact.

The District of Columbia has no distinct penal code, but in genera! the provisions glven in the table for Alaska woull apply.

NOTE - In the table below, after the agures glven, "years". 18 understood, unless otherwise stated. Where two figures are given, separated by a dash, as 1-7, the provision should be understood as "not less than one year nor more than seven," where a sum of money is given in the table the provision should be understood as meaning a One of not exceeding the sum mentioned. Arson.

Burglary.

Grand Rape. 1st Deg. 20 Deg. 1st Deg. 2d Deg. Larceny.

Bigamy. Perjury. Forgery. Death or Death or 2-10 1-20

1-10
2-5

2-5 2-10 not less not less

(a) than 10 than 10 3--20 10-20

1-15 2--5 1-10 1-7 3--10 2-20 2 (b)

(C) Not less Not less 1-10 1-15 Not more

1--10 Not over 1-14 1-14 3 than 5 than 2

than 5

10 and up to life

$2,000 Death 2-10

3--7

1-5 3-7 1-15 2-10 4

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5

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Not over Not over Not over Not over 8
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$1,000 $500
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$2,000 1-10 1-5 and 1-14 1-14 12

$1,000 1-14 2-5 or 2-21 or 2-14 or 13 (h) $1,000 $50 $1,000

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Any term Any term Not over up to life up to life

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