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1910.

ber.

RAILWAY EMPLOYEES IN THE UNITED STATES.
COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF EMPLOY KES AND AVERAGE DAILY COMPENSATION.
(From latest available Statistical Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission.)

1912.
1911.

1909.

AVERAGE
Per 100

Per 100
P'er 100

DAILY
Num
Class.
Num.

Per 100
Num.

Num-
Miles

Miles
ber.

Miles

miles

COMPENSATION. ber.

of line. of line.

ber. of line.

of line. 1912 1911 1910 General officers............... 5,790

5,628

5,476 2 5,492 2 13.13 12.99 13.27 Other oflicers

10,414 4 10.196 4 9,392 4 8,022 3 6. 32 6.27 6.22 General office clerks..

78,818 32 76,515 81 76,329 32 69,959 30 2.50 2.49 240 Station agents.

38,428 15

38,277 16 37.379 16 36,519 15 2.2012.17 2.13 Other station men. ...... 161.730 65 153,117 62 153,101 64 136,733 58 1.89 1.89 1.84 Enginemen.

64.382 20 63,890

64,691

27

67,071 245.00) 4.79 4.50 Firemen................

67,195 27 66,376 27 68,321 28 60,349 26 3. 02 2.94 2.74 Conductors

49,085 20 48,200 20 49,682 20 43,603 18 4.29 4.16 3.91 Other trainmen.

137,067 55 133,921

136,938 57 114,760 49 2.96 2.88 2.69 Machinists. ............

57,507 93 55,207 22 55,193 23 48.237 203.21 3.14 3.08 Carpenters,

70,817 28 65,989

68,088 28 69,867 20 2.55 2.54 2.51 Other shopmen.. 249,429 100 226,785 92 925,196

195,110 832.24 2.24 2.18 Section foremen.

44,277 18 44,466 18 44,207 18 41.859 182.09 2.07 1.99 Other trackmen

367,320 143 363,028 147 878,955 157 820,762 1361.50 1.50 1.47 Switchtenders, watchmen. 38,773 lö 40.005 16 44,682 19 44,699 19 1.70 1.74 1.69 Tel.operators, despatchers.. 42,548 17 41.196 17 42,435 18 39,115 17 2. 47 2.44 9.33 Emplo's-acc't float'g equip't. 12,056

10,436 4 10,549

8,758

2.57 2 34 2.99 All other emplo's and labor's. 230,138 92 227,779 93

229,806 95 210.898 90 2.10 2.08 2.01 Total. 11.716.380 687 1,669.8091 678 1,699,420) 706 1,502,823

638 * Does not include returns for switching aud terminal companies.

RAILWAY ACCIDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES, (From a Report Issued by Interstate Commerce Commission for Years Ended June 30, 1913 and 1912.)

STEAM RAILWAYS.

ELECTRIC RAILWAYS.
ITEM,

1913.
1912.
1913.

1912. Killed. Injured. Killed Injurel. Killed. In jurei. Killed. Injured. Passengers-In train accidents

191 8.662 139 9.391 10 1,252

7 1,462 Other causes

2:22 7,877 179 6.995 26 1.799 28 1,400 Total.................................

403 16.539 318 16,386 36

3 111

35 2,862

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108

Trespassers-In train accidents....

90 174 91 151 Other causes......

5,468 6,136 5.343 5,536

117 123 * 100 128 Total...................

5,558 6,310 5,434 5,687 117 1:3 100 Total accidents involving train operation. 10,550 86,688 10,185 77,175 403 4,608 300 4,112 Indutrial accidents to employés not involving train operation... 414 113,620 400 92,363 19 798

550 Grand total

10,964 200,308 10,585 169,538 422 5,406 324 4,602 The yearly tables show for the year ended June 30, 1911, the total number of casualties 160.555 (10,396 killed and 150,159 injured). of this number, 430 killed and 79,237 injured were railroad employés, on railroad premises, by accidents in which the movement of cars or engines is not involved; 5,284 persons were killed and 5,614 injured while trespassing on the property of the railroads, principally while walking on the tracks or stealing rides on trains.

The number of passengers carried during the year ended June 30, 1913, was 1,033,679,680; 1912, 994,158,591; 1911, 987,710,997. The passenger mileage or the number of passengers carried one mile in 1913 was 34,575,872,980; in 1912, 33,034,995,806.

PULLING POWER OF A CENTIPEDE LOCOMOTIVE. The Erie Railroad conducted a test at Binghamton, N. Y., on July 24, 1914, of the pulling power of the new Centipede locomotive, which weighs 410 tons and has twenty-four driving wheels. The officials in charge kept adding car after car of coal to the train until it consisted of 250 fully loaded ster) cars with a total weight of 21,000 tous. The locomotive pulled this train forty miles at the rate of fifteen miles an hour.

RAILWAY MILEAGE IN THE UNITED STATES. (From Statistical Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission for year ended June 30, 1912.)

Total mileage in each State as follows: Alabama 5,303, Alaska (see foot note), Arizona 2,156, Arkansas 5,271, California 8, 105, Colorado 5,737, Connecticut 1,001, Delaware 334, District of Columbia 35, Florida 4,808 Georgia 7,250, Hawaii (see foot note), Idaho 2,656, Tuinois 11,976, Indiana 7,444, Iowa 9,890, Kansas 9,137, Kentucky 3,609, Louisiana 5.686, Maine 2,252, Maryland 1,434. Massachusetts 2,114, Michigan 8,921, Minuesota, 8,986, Mississippi 4, 425, Missouri 8,125, Montana 4,358, Nebraska 6,135, Nevada 2,336, New Hampshire 1,245, New Jersey 2, 305, New Mexico

3,046, New York 8,500, North Carolina

5,172, North Dakota 4,509, Ohio 9,122, Oklahoma 6,160, Oregon 2,685, Pennsylvania 11,460, Rhode Island 203, South Carolina 3,563, South Dakota 4,206, Tennessee 3,978, Texas 16,322, Utah 2,029, Vermont 1,074, Virginia 4,601, Washington 5,178, West Virginia 3,795, Wisconsin 7,588, Wyoming 1,878.

Grand total mileage in ů. S. in 1906, 224,363; in 1907, 229,951; In 1908, 233,467: In 1909, 236,834; in 1910, 240, 293; in 1911, 243,979; in 1912, 246,816.

"Does not include mileage of switching and terminal companies. Mileage in Alaska, 462 miles; in Hawaii, 193 miles.

RAILWAYS OF AMERICA "GROUPED" BY CAPITALISTS. The great railroad systems of the United States have been reduced to a few'

''groups'' by means of consolidation and reconsolidation. The following is a list of these groups, which comprise threequarters of all the railroad lines of the country:

GROUPS.

Mileage.

Stocks,

Bonds.

Vanderbilt +

26, 110 $628,327,000 $763,419, 200 Pennsylvania.

21,312 779,510,000 576,300,000 Harriman

22,410 764,600,000 1,096, 773, 410 Hill......

14,163 415,527,000 430,812,000 Morgan......

13,987 673, 613, 000 544,987.000 Gould.

22,181 539,310.000 821, 604,000 Moore-Reid

29.143 372, 110,000 489, 104,000 Rockefeller's.

17,939 257,847,000 318, 212,000 Walters's..

11,373 149, 119,000 202,642,000 Eib Syndicate..............

12,980 344,698, 000 523, 370,000 Independent.

*34,623 652.607.000 485, 347,410 Total......

226,2211 $5,467, 268,000 $6, 252,571, 020 *In December, 1912, the U. S. Supreme Court held that ownership by the Oregon Short Line Rail. road on behalf of ine Union Pacific Railroad (controlled by the Harriman interests) of $126,650.000 of Southern Pacific Co. stock was in violation of the Sherman Anti-Trust law act, and Oregon Short Line has disposed of its interest in the Southern Pacific, which system is now an independent line

+ October 1, 1914, companys old $40,000,000 one-year notes to a syndicate headed by J. P. Morgan & Co.

OPERATIONS OF BRITISH RAILWAYS.

(Report of U. 8. Vice-Consul-General, London. ) GOVERNMENT returns show that during 1913 the railways of the United Kingdom carried 1,228,316,000 passengers and 371,571,000 tons of freight. The passengers were divided into classes as follows: First, 26,025,000; second, 12,088 000; third, 933,498,000, and workmen, 256,705,000. The number of season1-ticket holders is estimated to have been abont 595,000.

The length of the lines, reduced to single truck, was 55, 4:18 miles. The gross receipts of the companies were $677,674,724, of which $277,044,978 was derived from passenger traffic, $324,191,630 from freight traffic, and $76.438, 115 from other sources, mainly subsidiary businesses. The gross expenditure was $424,563, 193, of which $383,494,799 was devoted to operating expenses, leaving a net income of $253, 111,531.

The gross revenue and trading profit of the minor businesses are a matter of much interest and they are also shown: Gross Trading

Gross
ITEMS.

ITEMS.

Trading Revenue. Profit.

Revenne. Prot. Passenger road vehicles... $608,313 $14,599| Hotels and refreshment Steamboats......... 12,550,703) 705,642 rooms and cars.

$15,548,468 82,705,774 Canals. 5,358,016 1,708,142 Other businesses,

504,781 379,587 Docks, harbors and wharves

18,171,511
6,209,654
Total..

$52,791,7921 $11,723208 Sir Edgar Speyer, presiding at a meeting September 19, 1914, of the underground electric rail. ways in London, said 900,000,000 passengers had been carried without a single fatality since the opening of the tube and the electrification of the district railway

THE WORLD'S PRINCIPAL RAILROAD TERMINALS.
Total Length No.
No. of

Total Length No.

No. of Area, Track, or Plat

Area, Track,

of PlotAcres. Miles. Tracks forms.

Acres. Miles. Tracks forms. New York Central,

Chicago & NorthGrand Central

western, Chicago 8.0 2.7 16

8 Terminal, N. Y.

London, Waterloo City. 79.0 33.6 67 36 Statlon..

8.75

18 Pennsylvania Sta

Paris, St. Lazare. 11.2 3:5 31 i4 tlon, N. Y. City. 28.0 16.0 21

Frankfort, Main Washington, Union

Station.

11.0

18

9 Station...

13.0

29 13 Dresden, Maln StaSt. Louis, 'Union

tion....

7.0 3.0 Station.... 10.9 5.4 32 16 Cologne..

5.8

14

3.4 Boston, South Station...

9.2 15.0 32 19

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33

RAILWAY MILEAGE OF THE WORLD. (From "Archly für Elsenbahnwesen," May-June, 1912, published by Prusslan Ministry of Public Works, Berlin.)

SINGLE TRACK ONLY OR LENGTH OF THE LINE.

Total
COUNTRY.
State

Total
Mlle-

State
Owned.
COUNTRY:

Mile

Owned. age.

age. EUROPE:

AMERICA. Germany. 37,995 34,623||Canada

24,725 1,718 Austria-Hungary 27,570 22,046 United States

241,199 Great Britain

23,350
Newfoundland.

666
France.
30,686 5,510 Mexico..

15,260 Russia in Europe. 37.008 21,659 Central America.

1,598 Italy. 10,538 8.830 Greater Antilles.

3,031 42 Belgium, 5,287 2,685|Lesser Antilles.

336 Luxemburg 318 118 Colombla..

510 Netherlands. 1,984 1,063 Venezuela,

633 Switzerland. 2,921 1,701 British Guiana

103 Spain

9,316
Dutch Gulana.

37 Portugal.

1,807
67i Ecuador..

333
Denmark.
2,191 1,217 Peru.

1,584 843 Norway. 1,921 1,557|Bolivia.

756 Sweden. 8,687 2,716 Brazil..

13,278 5,443 Servia.

493
356) Paraguay.

157
Rumania
2,238 1,979 Uruguay

1,545 Greece

981
Chile

3,526

1.68 i Bulgaria..

1,106
*987 Argentina

17,793 2,467 Turkey in Europe.

967 Malta, Jersey, Man..

68
Totals...

327,070 12,194

AFRICA:
Totals...

207,432107,718
Egypt..

3,674 2,791 ASIA:

Alglers and Tunis

3,134 Russia (Central Asiatic Province) 4,066

Belgian Congo Colony

515 :::: Siberia, Manchuria.

6,739

6,180

South African Union:
China.

5,420
Cape Colony..

3,771 3,318 Japan. Including Korea. 6,0937 4,542 Natal.

1,092 1,092 British East India 32,091 24,459 Central South Africa.

2,589 2,589 Ceylon.

576
Rhodesia.

2,191 2,191 Persia..

Colonies of Asia Minor, etc.

3,129

giż||Germany: Portuguese India.

50
German East Africa

446 446 Malayan States.

757
German Southwest Africa.

992 992 Dutch India..

1,551
Togo....

185 185 Siam... 637 637 Cameroons

66

66. Cochin China, etc.

2,178
England..

1,806
France.

1,359 Totals. 63,320 36,730 Italy..

71 AUSTRALIA, ETC.:

Portugal.

1,001 New Zealand.

2,745 2,716 Victoria.

3,504 3,490
Totals

22,892 13,670 New South Wales

3,783 3,642

SUMMARY: South Australia 2,082 1,911 Europe..

207,432 107,718 Queensland. 4,011 3,660 America.

327,070 12,194 Tasmania. 633 469| Asla.

63,320 36,730 West Australla. 2,421 2,144 Africa.

22,892 13.670 Hawall, etc.

88
Australia, etc.

19,267 18,032 Totals 19,26718,032 Grand totals.

639,981 188.344 UNITED STATES STEAMBOAT INSPECTION SERVICE. THE Steamboat Inspection Service, by act of Congress approved February 14, 1903, was transferred from the Treasury Department to the Department of Commerce The transfer went into effect July 1, 1903. The Supervising Inspector-General of the Steamboat Inspection Service, George Uhler, reported to the Secretary of Commerce for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1914: Number of annual certificates of inspection issued to domestic steam, motor, sail vessels, and barges, 7,385; number of certificates issued to foreign steamers, 545; total number of annual certificates of 'inspection issued to domestic and foreign, 7,930. Decrease in number of certificates to domestic vessels from previous year, 130; increase in number of certificates to foreign vessels over previous year, 95, decrease in number of certificates of all kinds of vessels from previous year, 35. Gross tonnage of domestic vessels, all kinds, inspected, 5,596,504; gross tonnage of foreign steamers inspected, 4.374.006. Increase in gross tonnage of foreign steam vessels inspected over previous year, 946.692. Decrease in tonnage of all kinds domestic vessels inspected from previous year, 48,174. Number of officers' licenses issued, 18.871. Decrease in number of oflicers' licenses issued from previous year, 7,611. Number of new life-preservers inspected, 175, 332, of which number 1,210 were rejected.' Decrease in number of new life-preservers inspected from previous year. 58,351. Decrease in number of life-preservers rejected from previous year, 2,079. Number of marine boiler plates inspected at the mills by assistant inspectors, 3, 159. CAURES. Accidents. Lives Lost.

CAUSES.

Accidents. Lires Lost Fire.. 10 Accidental drowning.

115 Collision. 67 Suicides..

50 Explosions or accidental es

Miscellaneous..... cape of steam..

25 Snags, wrecks, and sinking...

295
Total

232 582 Number of accidents resulting in loss of life, 232. Increase in number of lives lost from previous year, 146. (During the year 318.094,347 passengers were carried on vesseis that are required by law to report the number of passengers carried. Dividing this number by 105, the total number of passengers lost, shows that 3,029, 469 passengers were carried for each lost.)

20

214 American Society for Judicial Settlement of International Disputes

--

The following table shows the estimated number of employés on the following roads now having pension systems in force. In general all the roads here shown base their pensions on a percentage of the employé's wages, multiplied by the number of years that he has been in service. For example, the rate on the Pennsylvanla is 1 per cent. A man having worked 40 years recelved s pension equal to 40 per cent. or his average salary for the 10 years preceding retirement. Most companles include in their rules a reservation of the right to vary the rate of pensions if the total requirements of any one year shall demand more than a predetermined gross amount. All of the companies in counting time include years of service under other companies bought by or consolidated with the present one. Short breaks in the service not due to any fault of the employé, or due to a minor fault involving suspensions, are generally overlooked.

No. of Amount

Number | Yrs. of Age Limit! AGE OF RETIREMENT, RAILROAD.

Em

Aypropri'd of Pen- Con. Ser. of New

ployees. Yearly. sioners. Requiru. Employees. Compu'yOptivnal. Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fé. 55,716 No llmit. 284

65 Atlantic Coast Line. 19,411 $18,000 75 io 45 70

61 Baltimore & Ohio..

67,711 129,247 862

45 None. 65 Bessemer & Lake Erle.

4,023

is

60 Boston & Malne.

28,464

269 Brooklyn Rapid Transit.

6)

70 Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh

7,341 25,000 57

35

65 Canadian Pacific Railway Co..

94.437 125,000 677 10

40

65 Chicago & Northwestern..

46,484 200,000 521

35

70 Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha 9,160 50,000

30

35

70 Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific.

36,841 No limit. 155

20
35
70

65 Delaware, Lackawanna & Western 22,479 85,000 310

Various.

70

60 Grand Trunk.. 4.505 90,000 430 i5 50

70

55 Illinois Central.

50,618 104,716 451

35

70

Various New York Central and Hudson River. 69,356 450.000 746 10 None. 70 New York, New Haven & Hartford. 34,521

:: New York Railways.

7,7001

32 Pennsylvania 124,451 700,000 2,976 30

70 Pennsylvanla Lines west of Pittsburgh.. 67,465 304,500 964

45

70 Philadelphia & Reading..

26.247 93,847 300

45

70 Philadelphia Rapid Transit. 9,000 No limit. 40

None. Southern Pacific.

47,507 229.667 610 Union Pacific....

19.9561 85,094 2581 20 35 70 oi For year ending June 30, 1913, the following pensions were paid by the railroads named: Ateblson, Topeka & Santa Fé, $77,204; Baltimore & Ohio, $212, 645; Boston & Maine, $93,087; New York Rallways, $7.472.

The U. $. Steel Corporation dedicated $8,000,000 for a fund with which to pension superannuated and disabled employés. This fund has been consolidated with the $4,000,000 fund created by Andrew Carnegle after he sold out his holdings in the Carnegie Steel Company to the U. 3. Steel Corporation. The fund is known as “The United States Steel and Carnegie Pension Fund."

The Western Union Telegraph Company, on January 1, 1913, established a Plan for Employés Pensions, Disability Benefits and Insurance, setting aside a fund of $1,000,000 for the purpose. Pensions are classified according to age and length of service. The minimum pension 13 $20 per month, except when otherwise directed. In cases of disability from sickness, full pay and half pay is allowed for various periods, depending upon length of service; provision is also made for disability resulting

from accidents and for life Insurance benefits, the amount of Insurance depending upon length of service.

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR JUDICIAL SETTLEMENT OF INTERNATIONAL

DISPUTES. The American Society for Judicial Settlement of International Disputes was formed in 1910 for the purpose of promouing, the establishment oi a judicial tribunal which would perform for the nations of the civilized world a similar service to that which is given by ordinary courts to individuals. and of encouraging recourse to such a tribunal after its establishment.

During this period annual conferences bave been held, the printed proceedings of which have been a valuable acquisition to libraries and to all interested in the development of judicial settle ment and of international law: men of distinguished ability and unquestioned Influence contributed the papers, some of which have been voluntarily translated into French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

Quarterly pamphlets, each containing an appropriate monograph by some acknowledged authority on subjects tending advance the purpose of the society, have been issued, not only to members, but to a carefully selected list of 30,000 names, including the leading law schools and universities throughout the world.

A copy of all publications is sent to the foreign office of every nation and to the heads of forelga legations in Washington.

There is a widespread and growing interest in the work of the society: hardly a day passes without requests, not only from America but from many parts of the world for copies of the panphlets, which are always sent free of charge. The omcers and Executive Committee are much gratined at the interest awakened by their efforts, but are obliged to issue an earnest appeal for contributing members in order to continue the work on the present scale.

The object of the founders of the society was to give it a large following, and so there were three classes of membership established (life, sustalning, and annual), with equal privileges, leaving each member to determine what he would give, and in order that it might be beyond the reach ot none, the subscription for annual membership was fixed at one dollar. At the same time, in order to obtain a more adequate income, a sustainlng membership at ten dollars a year was established. President-Charles W. Eliot, Cambridge, Mass. Vice-President-Theodore Marburg.

Secretary-James B. Scott, Washington, D. C. Assistant Secretary-Tunstall Smith, Baltimore, Md. Treasurer-J. G. Schmidlapp, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Lile membership, $100; sustalning membership, $10 a year; annual membership. $1 a year.

69.56

Feb.,

102

RAILROAD SPEED.
NOTABLE FAST RUNS OF PASSENGER TRAINS FOR LONG DISTANCES.

INCI.UITK.

Dis-
DATR.
Railrond.

Terminals.

Mires
Lance, Time,
Miles. H. AL.

Hur. May, 181%. Great Western (England),

London - Didcot

53. 250. 47 08 Aug., 1888. Loudon, N.W. & Caledonian.. Loudon-Edinburgh

400

7. 38 5.4 Aug., 1894. Plant System, Atlantic Coast Line Jacksonville-Richmond.

661.5 12.51 51.48 April, 1895. Pemusylvania...

Camden --Atlantic City.

58.3 0.4594 76.00 Aug. , 1845. London & Northwestern

London-Aberdeen..

540 8.32 63.39 Sept. 1895. New York Central & H. R. New York-Bullalo...

436.50 6.47 64.33" Sept., 1895. N.Y.Central "World Flyer Albany--Syracuse.....

148 2.10 64.3 Feb., 1897. Chicago, Burlington & Quincy. Chicago-Denver.....

1,025 18.62 56.74 April, 1897. Lelrigh val., Black Diamond Exp. Alpine, N. Y.-Geneva Junc., N. Y.. 43.93 0.33 May, 1900. Burlington Route....

Burlington-Chicago....

205.8 3.08% 65.51 Mar., 1902. Burlington Route..

Eckley-Wray

14.8 0.9 Aug., 1902. - 20th Century Ltd. ,' on L.Sbore Kendallville-Toledo,

91 1.15 728 Mar., 1903. Atlantic Coast Line.

Jacksonville-Savannah.

172 2. 32 70.7 May, 1903. 20th Century Lu.. on L Shore Toledo- Elkhart..

183.4 1.54 70.2 July, 1903. Great Western (England). London - Plymouth...

246 3.54 163, 13 April, 1904. Michigan Central...

Niagara Falls-Windsor.

225.66 3.111 10.74 July, 1944. Great Western (England) Paddington -- Bristol..

118.5 1.34 84.6 Nov., 1904. Pennsylvalja........

Crestline-Fort Wayne.

131 1.53 June, 1905. Pennsylvania

Chicago-Pittsburgli..

468 17.20

63:03" June, 1905. Lake Shore & Mich. Southern. Butalo --Chicago.

525 7.50 69.691 June, 1906. Pennsylvania...

New York --Chicago.

897 16.3 56.07 June, 1905. New York (entral

Chicago-New York

960.5 15.56 60.986 July, 1905. Pennsylvania Washington, Ohio-Fort Wayne. 81 1.4

75.84 Oct., 1906. Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne & C... Crestline, Ohio-Clark Junc., Iud.. 257.4 3.27 74.55 Mar., 1909. New York Central.

New York Chicago......

965 15. 43 62.341 1911. Pennsylvania... Altoona-Philadelphia..

3.29 67.2 *Including stops. Excluling stops. FASTEST RECORDED RUNS FOR SHORT DISTANCES.

Dis

Miles

Time,
Dars.
Railroad.

Terminals.

tance,
Milen,

11our. May, 1898. N. Y. Central & H. R.

Crittenden--"Empire State Exp." 1 0.32 112.5 Aug., 1896. Pennsylvania...

Landover-Anacosta...

5.1 3.00 Jan., 1899. Burlington Route.....

Siding-Arion....

2.4 1.20 108 Mar., 1901. Plant System.

Run from Fleming to Jacksonville. 5 3.30 120 Jan., 1963. . Y. Central & H. R...

Palmyra -- Macedon...

7.29 4.00 109.35 April, 1904. Michigan Central....... Crisman-Lake.....

3.732.00 111.90 July, 1904. Phila, & Reading

Egg Harbor - Brigantine Junction. 4.8 2.30 115.20 Oct., 1904. N. Y. Central & H.R..

Croton-Ossining.......

3.ol / 2.00 105 The fastest time on record for a distance of over 140 miles was inade by the lake Shore and Miclina Southern R.1:. from Boffalo to Chicago, in June, 1905, noteil abore. The fastest long-distance run less than 410 miles was on the New York Central R.R. September 11, 1995, froin New York to Buffalo, 436 1-2 miles, in 407 minutes actnal time. Average speed, 64 1-3 mmiles an hour, with two stops and 28 slow-ups, and on January 1, 1903, from Albany to Buffalo, 302 miles, in 995 iniuntes.

Among the fastest regular trains in the United States, for a shorter distance, are believed to be the New York Central "Empire State Express," between New York and Albany, 113 lesin 175 ininutes, and the “Congressional Limited," on the Pronsylvania Rulroud, which inakes the run from Jersey (lly to Washingion in 4 hours 46 minutes, a distance of 297 miles. The "l'ennsylvania Special" over P. R. K. which runs from Jersey City to North Philadelphia, 81 miles in 83 minutes; froin Jersey City to Harrisburg, PA, 194 miles in 196 minutes. The Royal Blue Line from New York to Philadelphia (Reading Terminal) 91.1 miles in 1 hour, 50 minutes. On November 25, 1:13, a special trin, ronsisting of a locomotie and two cars, rau from Washin ston, D. C., to Jersey City, *7 miles, in four hours, the fastest trip ever made between the two cities.

On August 15, 1893, ont. & i. and C. R. R. o N.J., "Royal Blue Live," between Elizabeth, N. J., and Jenkintown, a distafice of 69 iniles, in 61 ininutes, including 2 slow-lips, some of the miles being traverseil in 38 seconds.

Other notable long-distance fast ran: February 14-15, 1897-Pennsylvania Hailmad and C., B, and Q., Jersey City to Deaver, 1,937 miles, ia 48 hours; averase speel, 40.5 miles per hour. Aug 1st 29-31, 1891- Canadian Pacific, Vancouver to Brockville, 2,-02 miles, in 17 hours 9 minutes; average speel, 36.32 miles per bour.

The Jarrett and Pauliner special theatrical traill, Jersey City to Oakland (San Francisco), 3,311 miles, Jane, 1876,83 hours 45 uninntes: average speel, *9.5 miles per hour.

In October, 1905, the Harrim'in special" made the run from Oakland to Jersey City (3,239 miles) in 73 hours, 19 minutrs, or 41.30 miles per hour. In May, 1906, the " Harriman Special ” male the run from 0. kland, Cal., to New York City in 71 hours 97 minutes.

The "Scott Sneria!" left Los Angeles, Cal., July 9, 1905, and arrived in Chicago (2,416.5 miles), July 11, having made the run in 14 hours 54 minutos, mintaining an average speed while in motion of 51 milex an hour.

On November 15, 1901, at Clayton, N. J., in a tri il test on Pennylvania R. R. between steam and electric locomntives, the stem engine made 93.6 miles an hour on a specially built seven mile curved track, while the electric locomotive maile but 90 miles nn hour.

A special train of an engine and two cars, which was run in January, 1911, to carry J. P. Morgan from Washington to New York over the Pennsylvania Railroal, ma le the trip of 224.3 miles in 3 hours, 55 minutes and 30 se onds, or at the role of 37.8 miles an hour. The speed or r the New York divisiin, West Phila lelphia to New York, 90.5 miles, average i 67 miles : huur.

In February 1911; the "Gates Special;" t.om Yuna, Arizont, New York, 2,787... les, maile che run in 24 hours 19 minutes, or an average of 10.41 miles per hour, inudin: stops. From Alhany to New York the irip, 143 miles, was made in 143 mipates.

A remarka le record wi8 nule in the run of Asilk trai' between Seattle and New York in Octoler, 1911. The distance is 3,178 iniles, and the tim. maile 24 hours. The averag: pe d all the way across the coutinent, including stops and a delay of more tbau two huurs in switching at Chicago, was 38% mies per hour.

SOME FOREIGN RAILWAY RUNS. The Northern Railway runs a day express from Burlinn to Paris, which covers the distance from Paris to St. Quentin (962 miles) in 93 miantes. The Eastern Railway Company bas an afternood express from Paris to Basel, which runs the first 10: 37 miles in 101 minutes. The fastest train in fierming is the so-called " D-Zug 20” between Berlin and Hamburg, whica maintains au average speed of 55.117 m. les per hour. (U. S. Consular Report.)

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